New study reveals ‘striking’ disparity in emergency care use for people with mental ill health

People with mental ill health had almost five times more emergency hospital admissions last year relative to people without; yet the vast majority of these emergency admissions were not explicitly to support mental health needs, and a proportion of them were potentially preventable.

Press Release

Published: 14/10/2015

People with mental ill health had almost five times more emergency hospital admissions last year relative to people without; yet the vast majority of these emergency admissions were not explicitly to support mental health needs, and a proportion of them were potentially preventable.

The findings, contained in a new study published by the Nuffield Trust and Health Foundation, suggest that people with mental ill health are not having their physical health adequately managed, despite being known to the NHS for their mental health needs.

Drawing on analysis of over 100 million hospital records per year, the research compares hospital use between two patient groups: people who have previously been to hospital for their mental health and people whose previous hospital use does not relate to mental health. The analysis looks at patterns of emergency and planned hospital use between 2009/10 and 2013/14.

To read the full press release, including key findings and spokespeople’s comments, please visit the dedicated QualityWatch website .