Adults with learning disabilities who live in their own home or with their family

We look at the proportion of adults with a learning disability who live in their own home or with their family.

Indicator

Last updated: 11/01/2019

Effective clinical care Patient experience
Learning disability Social care Integrated care

We know that appropriate accommodation for people with learning disabilities has a strong impact on their safety and overall quality of life, while also reducing social exclusion. However, many people with a learning disability do not have a choice about where they live or who they live with.

NHS England, the Local Government Association and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Care set out a commitment to significantly increase housing options for people with learning disabilities in the Building the right home document. By enabling people to access the right home and support at the right time they hope that this will also support the reduction in overall inpatient capacity by March 2019. NHS England has made £100 million available between 2016 and 2021 to support the Transforming Care Programme.


What proportion of adults with learning disabilities live in their own home or with their family? 11/01/2019

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The proportion of adults aged 18-64 with a learning disability who live in their own home or with their family increased from 59% in 2010-11 to 77.2% in 2017-18. In 2017-18 there were 101,599 adults receiving long-term disability support who were living in their own home or with their family in England.


How does the proportion of adults with a learning disability who live in their own home or with their family vary across England? 11/01/2019

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In 2017-18, there were large regional differences throughout England in terms of the proportion of adults with a learning disability who live in their own home or with their family. The highest proportions were found in the three most northern regions (North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber). The lowest proportions were found in the West Midlands, the South East and London. The North West had the highest proportion of adults with a learning disability who live in their own home or with their family (88.2%) and the West Midlands had the lowest proportion (72.3%).


About this data

This indicator uses data from outcome measure 1G of NHS Digital's Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The measure shows the proportion of all adults (aged 18-64) with a primary support reason of learning disability support who are "known to the council" who are recorded as living in their own home or with their family.

The definition of individuals 'known to the council' is defined as those adults of working age with a primary support reason of learning disability support who received long term support during the year.

'Living on their own or with their family' is intended to describe arrangements where the individual has security of tenure in their usual accommodation - for instance, because they own the residence or are part of a household whose head holds such security.

For more information, please see The Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework 2018/19, Handbook of Definitions

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